Conrad Strader

Male - Bef 1809


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  • Name Conrad Strader 
    Gender Male 
    _UID B393214186B84275B97A1ABD7BE71E85AC96 
    Died Bef Mar 1809  Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I2988  Bennett, Harrison, and Herron Families
    Last Modified 15 Mar 2009 

    Children 
     1. Peter Strader,   d. Bef Apr 1811, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Barbara Strader
     3. Mary Strader
     4. Margaret Strader
     5. Catherine Strader
     6. Ester Strader
     7. Henry Strader,   b. Bef 1765,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Married: Mary Scott
     8. Lewis Strader,   b. Bef 1774,   d. Yes, date unknown
     9. Christian Strader,   b. Abt 1770, Guilford County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     10. David Strader,   d. Bef Apr 1826, Caswell County, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location
    Married: Prudence
    Last Modified 17 Mar 2019 
    Family ID F932  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 

    • Lord Granville of Great Britain was the only one of eight Lords Proprietors to retain his lands in Carolina after the other Lord Proprietors had returned their Crown Grants to control of the English king in about 1729. The northern boundary of Granville's land ran along the Virginia state line east to the Atlantic Ocean and west to the "westward waters" having no idea at the time how far those westward waters would be. The land extended southward covering about the northern half of the present state of North Carolina. The only other Lords Proprietor to hold lands in the region was Henry McCulloh. "All land ownerships originated with these two land holders until after the Revolution. After that, the source of new land was the state, which had confiscated all ungranted land and land that had been owned by active Tories." (Hughes p.4)

      Lord Granville appointed agents to assign land grants to the early settlers within his land holdings. Granville died in 1763 making null and void the authority for his agents to continue to issue grants for the land and the land grant offices were closed. Hundreds of families settled on ungranted land of which they had no legal claim in the belief that the land grant office would eventually reopen but it never happened. The controversies over legal land holdings, land theft, and taxes and fees by greedy officials in North Carolina would continue to be a growing problem for years to come culminating in one of the first major conflicts between the early settlers and the English Crown at Alamance Creek and eventually into war.

      No further land grants were issued until after the American Colonies declared their independence from England and land became the price for service in the Revolution for the early American settlers. This created a large movement of emigration into the colonies for those seeking to gain their own personal freedoms from oppression. When the state began to open new land grant offices in 1778 it would be the authority of each state to issue land grants. Those settlers who had settled on vacant lands while the land grant offices were closed were given the first right to establish their land claims with the state land grant office. States passed legislation to attempt to correct the previous wrongs of the proprietors but land disputes would continue for years to come as local and state officials became the new breed of land thieves. Many land owners would lose the property they had claimed through legal loopholes but none would suffer the loss more than the Quakers because of their pacifist doctrine.

      It was in this setting and time period that the Strader families of German origin came to North Carolina with their families to begin a new life.
      (Narrative compilation by Elvin E. Perkins, Jr. and Jamie C. Smith.)

      1752. Orange County, North Carolina was formed from Granville, Johnston, and Bladen Counties. It was said to be named for William III of the House of Orange who ruled England from 1689 to 1702 but it is believed it may have been named for the infant William V who's mother was Anne, daughter of George II, King of England.

      22 Nov. 1752. Conrad Strader departs from Rotterdam, Holland aboard the ship Phoenix and immigrates to the American Colonies arriving in the port at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

      1753. Rowan County, North Carolina was formed from Anson County.

      Circa 1755. Conrad Strader appears in a tax list of Orange County, North Carolina. (This appears to be the earliest known record found for Conrad in North Carolina. It needs to be further researched.)

      6 Sept. 1761. The Pennsylvania Archives, series 2, Vol II, lists Conrod Stightner naturalized in Berks Co., Pennsylvania. This appears to be Conrad Strader.

      Circa 1764. Conrad Strader appears in Orange County, N. C. Court records.

      29 May 1769. Henry Grubb & wife Eve Dorothy to Conrad Strader for 114 pds., 589 acres on Second Creek & Davis Branch adjoining Richard Morly & Jacob Fullwider granted to them April 4, 1761. Witnesses - John Forhock, Henry Hardman and a "German." Rowan Co. Deed Book 7, p. 123

      Circa 1770. Biddy Strader the daughter of Conrad married John Nichols.

      1771. Guilford County, North Carolina was formed from Rowan and Orange Counties. The county was named for the English Parliament member Francis North, first Earl of Guilford who was born in 1704.

      17 Jan. 1772. Conrad Strader of Guilford Co. to Michael Hartman Dillon for 130 pds. proclamation money, 589 acres on south side Second Creek & Davis Branch adjacent Richard Morby and Jacob Fulwider granted Henry Grubb, April 4, 1761 and sold to Strader on May 29, 1769. Witnesses - George Henry Berger, Arthur Greer and a "German." Rowan Co. Deed Book 7, p. 399.

      2 June 1775. Conrad's daughter Barbara married Abraham Shelley in Orange County, North Carolina. The marriage could have taken place in either of two areas of present day N. C., Caswell County or Alamance County. Both of these counties were later taken from Orange County which bordered Guilford County on the east side in 1775.

      26 May 1776. From the Moravian Freidberg Diary - "At the home of my host, Jacob Christman, I found more than twenty men and women, to whom I could say many things for the blessings of their souls, finding their hearts open and receptive. One man, Conrad Streter, asked whether he could send his children to Salem to school? I answered that it be done, if he could pay someone to take care of them in his home, but that would be too expensive for him. He said he would be glad to sell his place here if he could get another near a congregation of the Brethren." 28 MAY 1776: "In the morning at 6 o'clock we began our journey homeward, bidding a hearty farewell to our host and many others. The elder Christman and Conrad Streter went with us 10 miles." (Salem: a Moravian settlement now called Old Salem which now lies in modern day Winston- Salem, N. C. and is a restored historic site with many of the old original buildings still remaining and in which one can still see and study the old Moravian customs and culture.)

      1777. Caswell County, North Carolina was formed from Orange County. It was named for Richard Caswell a member of the first Continental Congress who also served as a Major General in the American Revolution and was North Carolina's first governor. The county borders Virginia on the north side.

      2 June 1777. The next trip to Reedy Fork recorded in the Bethania Diary of 1777 reports on June 2nd that the minister stopped at Heinrich Streeder's plantation where a service was held. 3 June 1777: The minister visited at the home of Conrad Streeder, "but he was on his plantation thirty miles away."

      29 Nov. 1777. William Grayham and wife Rachel of Caswell Co., to Conrad Strader of same County for 210 pds., 215 acres on north side of Hogan's Creek adjoining a part of tract that Robert Jones, Jr. purchased of Earl Granville by deed of 25 October 1748. Witnesses - Thomas Rice, Lancelot Johnson, and Edward Graham. Caswell Co. Deed Book A, p. 37 (Kendall, p. 3).

      11 June 1778. Conrad's son Peter married Mary Ann Baxter in Caswell Co., N. C.

      26 Dec. 1780. Conrad's daughter Mary married Peter Shelley, Guilford Co., N. C.

      July 1782. Because of the war (the American Revolution), the next trip of the Moravian Minister was not made until July 1782 when it is said, "Our friends there have fallen into distress and need, especially during the time when both armies were near them, and through their own fault since most of them behaved as Tories. Three lost their lives...Heinrich Streder and Joh. Sommer have not dared to appear to this hour, since they went with the English Army, and their families doubt whether they are still living." The writer mentions the heads of families that he visited, including George Streder, but apparently Conrad Strader had moved on to Hogans Creek in Caswell County, North Carolina by this date.

      9 Oct. 1782. Conrad's daughter Katherine married Peter Lewis. They were probably married in Guilford County although no marriage bond has been found. The date comes from an old family record passed down to descendants.

      10 Dec. 1782. Andrew Ferguson and wife Margaret of Halifax Co., Virginia, for 60 pds. Virginia money, to Conrad Strader 258 acres on south side of Hogan's Creek adjoining Peter Smith & William Graham. Witnesses - Charles Burton, William Holderness, and Henry Black. Caswell Co. Deed Book B, p. 15 (Kendall, p. 37).

      13 Oct. 1783. North Carolina (#595) to Wyatt Stubblefield, 560 acres on both sides of Hogan's Creek adjoining the Guilford County line (later Rockingham Co., which was formed from Guilford Co. in 1785), Graham, and Conrad Strader. Caswell Co. Deed Book B, p. 273 (Kendall, p. 50).

      13 Oct. 1783. Richard Beasley granted 640 acres on Hogan’s Creek near Reedy Fork adjacent Conrad Straytor, Jame Cargile, and George Grayham. Caswell Co. Deed Book D, p. 225 (Kendall, p. 81).

      13 Oct. 1783. North Carolina (#598) to Peter Elmore 236 acres on Hogan's Creek adjoining Conrad Strader near George Graham. Caswell Co. Deed Book B, p. 273 (Kendall, p. 51).

      1784: Caswell County, N. C. tax listing - Conrad Strader listed 731 acres of land on Hogans Creek in the Caswell District. Also listed is his son Henry who owns 258 acres on Hogans Creek. (Kendall, p. 137)

      16 mar. 1784. Conrad's son Henry married Mary Scott in Caswell County, N. C.

      1785. Rockingham County, North Carolina was formed from Guilford County. It was named for Charles Watson- Wentworth, 2nd Marquis of Rockingham who supported independence for the American colonies. The county borders Virginia on the north side.

      17 Jan. 1787. Conrad's son Lewis married Mary Larimore in Caswell Co., N. C.

      9 Mar. 1787. Richard Beasley and wife Janney of Caswell Co., to Conrod Straydor of Caswell Co., for 100 pds, 403 acres adjoining William Moss. Witnesses - William Moss, Wyatt Stubblefield, and A. Graves. Caswell Co. Deed Book E, p. 153 (Kendall, p. 95).

      12 Feb. 1788. Charles Brookes of Caswell Co., to Conrad Strader of same for 100 pds., sale of Negro woman Hanna age 24 years which came to him from Henry Williams deceased. Witnesses - Abedego Cooksey & Ann Stubblefield. Caswell Co. Deed Book J, p. 230 (Kendall, p. 166).

      1 Oct. 1788. Conrad Strader witnessed deed from Richard Beasley and his wife Jean to Wyatt Stubblefiled for 222 acres on Hogan’s Creek, which is part of tract #639 granted to Beasley by State. Caswell Co. Deed Book F, p. 9-10 (Kendall, p. 105).

      1 June 1790. Conrad Strader and sons Henry and Lewis appear in the first United States Census living in the Hillsborough District of Caswell County, North Carolina. (This census in Caswell County is based on tax records to establish the heads of households because the actual 1790 population schedules of Caswell County were accidentally destroyed.)

      Circa 1790. Conrad's daughter Ester married William Elmore, probably in Caswell County, North Carolina.

      17 Oct. 1792. Henry Strader purchased 180 1/2 acres on Hogan’s Creek adjacent Tilman Dixon, from William Graham Jr. for 100 pounds. Land was granteed Graham by State. Conrad Strader and William Elmore witnessed the deed. Caswell Co. Deed Book H, p. 312 (Kendall, p. 149).

      Circa 1794. Conrad's son Christian married Zeporiah Summers, probably in Caswell County, North Carolina.

      16 Dec. 1795: Frederick William Marshall of Stokes Co., (North Carolina) to Conrad Strader of Caswell Co., for 120 pds., 200 acres adjoining Robert King, Abraham Womack, Matthew Mills, William Graham, and James Perkins, being part of tract conveyed by Earl of Granville to William Churton and from Churton to Charles Metcalf and by the General Assembly in 1782 confirmed to F. W. Marshall. Witnesses - Gottlieb Shober and Henry Strader. Caswell Co. Deed Book K, p. 12 (Kendall, p. 173)

      Circa 1796. Conrad's son David married Prudence (last name unknown), probably in Caswell County, North Carolina.

      12 Nov. 1796. Edward Moore, sgent for William F. Booker of Columbia Co., Georgia to Conrad Strader of Caswell Co., for 300 pds., 370 acres adjoining Ferguson and Elmore being a grant from the State to William Moore and conveyed by Moore to Booker. Witness - J. Grant, Jr., Samuel Moore, and Christian Strader. Caswell Co. Deed Book K, p. 25 (Kendall, p. 174).

      21 Jan. 1797. Conrad Strader to Henry Strader for 100 pds., 200 acres on Hogan's Creek or John's Branch adjoining Robert King, Abraham Womack, Matthew Mills, William Graham, and James Perkins, being tract conveyed by F. W. Marshall to Conrad Strader. Witness - James Grant, Jr., Christian Strader, and Joshua Grant. Caswell Co. Deed Book K, p. 25 (Kendall, p. 174).

      25 Jan 1797. Conrad Strader to Christian Strader for 110 pds., 218 acres on Hogan's Creek adjoining Elmore, Obediah Tucker, and William Moss. Witness - J. Grant, Jr., Joshua Grant, and David Powell. Caswell Co. Deed Book K, p. 25 (Kendall, p. 174).

      14 Feb 1797. Conrad Strader of Caswell Co., NC to Peter Asheleegh and Michael Dayvalt of western territory (Sullivan County, Tennessee) for 60 pds., 288 acres in Caswell Co., on south side of Hogan's Creek, land granted to Strader by Andrew Ferguson whereon Henry Strader lately lived adjoining Peter Smith and William Grayham. Witness - Joel Stubblefield, David Strader, and Peter Lewis. Caswell Co. Deed Book K, p. 118 (Kendall, p. 180).

      12 May 1798. Conrad Strader to Peter Strader for 1 shilling, 160 acres both sides of Hogan's Creek adjoining Lewis Strader, Peter Elmore, Christian Strader, and Moss's corner. Witness - Thomas Duncan, Lewis Strader, and Elias Griffith. Caswell Co. Deed Book K, p. 343 (Kendall, p. 193).

      12 May 1798. Conrad Strader to Lewis Strader of Caswell Co., for 100 shillings, 220 acres on north side of Hogan's Creek adjoining Peter Strader, and William Moss. Witness - Thomas Duncan, Peter Strader, and Elias Griffith. Caswell Co. Deed Book K, p. 369 (Kendall, p. 194).

      13 June 1799. Conrad Strader to William Bloyd for 180 pds., 330 acres on Hogan's Creek whereon Blyod lives being part of 372 acres granted to William Moore. Witness - Robert Mitchell, Jacob Blyod, and Alexander Paschal. Caswell Co. Deed Book L, p. 156 (Kendall, p. 202).

      17 Sep 1803. Conrad Strader of Caswell Co., to David Strader of Caswell Co., for "fatherly love to his son" and for 100 pds., 304 acres on Hogan's Creek where they both live adjoining Wyatt Stubblefield. Witness - Farlow Davis, Joel Stubblefield, and James Grant, Jr. Caswell Co. Deed Book N, pp. 249-250 (Kendall, p. 253).

      12 Feb 180. Peter Elmore of Caswell Co., to John Hudnall of Caswell Co., for $450, 236 acres where he now lives on Hogan's Creek adjoining Peter Strader. Witness - Thomas B. S. Moss, William Moss, and William Moss, Jr. Caswell Co. Deed Book O, p. 90 (Kendall, p. 261).

      24 Oct 1807. Conrad Strader to Elijah Withers of Rockingham Co., NC for 70 pds., (?) acres of land adjoining Withers, Powell, Wyatt Stubblefield, and David Strader. Witness - R. W. Stubblefield, John Hudnall, and James Gatewood. Caswell Co. Deed Book P, pp. 102-103 (Kendall, p. 280)

      7 Oct. 1808. Will of Conrad Strader, Caswell Co. Will Book F, p. 19 (Kendall, p. 114).

      In the name of God amen I Conrad Strader being sick and low in health but of sound sense and perfect memory and recollecting the uncertainty f life doth make constitute and establish this and this only as my last Will and testament revoking annulling and making void all Wills heretofore made by me and as what it hath pleased God to bless me with I dispose of as follows Imprimus I recommend my Soul to God who gave it and my body to the dust from whence it came to be decently buried at the expence of my Estate
      Item I leave to Marget Daywalt all the property of mine that she has now in her possession - - - -
      Item I give to Mary Shelly all the property of mine now in her possession - - - -
      Item I give to Katy Lewis all the property of mine now in her possession - - - -
      Item I give to Ester Elmore all the property of mine now in her possession - - - -
      Item I give to my three grandchildren Marget Nichols John Nichols and Frances Nichols twenty three pounds six and eight pence apiece to be collected of Elijah Withers and given to them when they marry or arrive at the age of twenty one years - - -
      Item All the rest of my property I give to be equally divided between my six children Barbary Shelly Henry Strader Peter Strader Lewis Strader Christian Strader and David Strader to them and their Heirs forever the two Negroes to be set up and sold at two years credit but to be bought by one of the six children and each child's part of the money to be paid them within two years after my decease
      Item It is my desire that no part of the above property shall be taken from my wife unless with her consent except the Negroes during her life but no part of said property to be moved by her out of the County
      Lastly I do appoint Peter Strader Christian Strader and David Strader my Executors of this my last Will and Testament In Witness whereof I hereunto set my hand and affix my Seal this Seventh day of October one Thousand eight hundred and eight
      Signed Sealed and Acknowledged in the presence of Elijah Withers
      Conrad Strader (Seal)
      State of North Carolina, Caswell County, March Court 1809 - - - The Execution of this Will was duly proved in open Court by the Oath of Elijah Withers the Subscribing Witness Thereto and on motion ordered to be recorded at the same time Christian Strader and David Strader qualified Executors therto and letters Testamentary issued accordingly A E Murphey CC Agreeable to an order of the County Court of Caswell October Term 1814 that we James Powell, William Weatherford, and Elijah Wethers, should settle withers Christian and David Strader, Executors of Conrad Strader deceased and report thereon to next court brung together we find by the papers produced that the account of said Estate after deducting all costs and charges is Two hundred pounds eight shillings and one penny and that legates part is thirty three pounds eight shillings and one farthing Virginia currency. Given an order hands and seals this 18th day of October 1814. William Witherford, Elijah Wethers . - - -State of North Carolina, Caswell County, January Court 1815, This report was duly returned to Court which was approved of and ordered to be recorded. A. E. Murphey, CC

      January Court 1815. Settlement of account of Conrad Strader, deceased by Christian and David Strader, Caswell County, North Carolina. Caswell Co. Will Book G, p. 61 (Kendall, p. 4).